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RPA Offers Peace Mind from Catastrophic Human Error

Posted by Francine Haliva on Jun 15, 2017 11:26:08 AM

Recent events bring the obvious to the forefront– it's a good idea to double check your employees' work.  British Airways could face £100m in compensation, additional customer care, and lost business resulting from a catastrophic IT meltdown that affected more than 1,000 flights and left 75,000 travelers stranded last month. A couple month's prior, significant portions of the Internet were crippled when part of Amazon’s Web Services experienced an hours-long outage. Within several hours, Amazon’s cloud service was back online, but not before costing S&P 500 companies $150 million and U.S. financial-service companies $160 million in lost revenue. The culprit in both cases? One employee's human error.

My heart goes out to those two employees, it really does, because it could have been any one of us that wreaked this havoc. After all – to err is human.  Whether big or small, errors can lead to repercussions that negatively impact profit, resources and the overall workflow of an organization. They undercut quality, compliance and customer service. They create waste in otherwise useful systems and counteract the ROI from training, processes and procedures.   

So what can we do to ensure we don't make a simple mistake at work that could potentially cost our employers and the economy millions? This is where Robotic Process Automation (RPA) comes to the rescue. Here is how RPA offers organizations the peace of mind that processes are executed error free:

1. Let your virtual workforce do the job

Error reduction is one of RPA's most arresting qualities.  When you think about RPA, the first thing that comes to mind is automating manual tasks that are time consuming and error prone.  A classic example is claims processing which depends heavily on manual labor. The situation can worsen if the workforce is outsourced and there is language or cultural differences. Once RPA is deployed, software robots can work 24/7 with amazing accuracy, thus eliminating the margin of human error, increasing processing efficiency and cutting operational costs. 

Extra caution for accuracy is also important when you need to ensure that the process is executed in accordance with policy .  Using the same example, constant changes in government regulations greatly impact claims processing. This problem intensifies many times over if the company operates in different states and countries, each with its own sets of laws and regulations.  With RPA, the end result is not only elimination of human error, but also adherence to compliance requirements and faster execution of processes.

2. Provide your human workforce with the right tools

Even after you’ve offloaded repetitive, rules-based tasks to your virtual workforce, many business processes will continue to be done by people.  In these instances, Kryon's RPA Platform also provides an 'attended automationsolution to ensure that the tasks done by employees will also be executed quickly, error free and in compliance with corporate policy.

Using Kryon's attended automation, Leo sensors add a safety net around possible pitfalls by silently monitoring task execution on the desktop to ensure that an employee does not make an error.  If an issue occurs, Leo will alert the user and offer attended automation to ensure the task is done correctly, in the most efficient manner possible.  For example, if an employee enters the wrong information or forgets to enter/select a value (e.g. forgot to check a checkbox), a warning message pops up alerting the employee to make the correction. 

To find out more about Kryon Systems RPA solutions and how it can help your organization eliminate employee human error, please schedule a demo or visit the Kryon Systems website. 

Topics: Robotic Process Automation, RPA, Attended RPA, Unattended RPA


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